We all know that organizations are made up of many people, so why is it that the leaders get all the credit and most of the cash? In the Iron Man films, Tony Stark, the admiral of Stark Industries, is presented as a wild innovator and abstruse genius.

He swipes at basic screens, cuts and welds, and stays up for days. This is what a boy wonder looks like. Apart from a few people in suits, we never see the employees, the people who make the profits that accustomed Stark Industries to build its Manhattan skyscraper.

From Steve Jobs and Bill Gates onwards, the heroic owner of a tech aggregation has become a accustomed figure in the global business pages. Characters like Elon Musk (PayPal), Mark Zuckerberg (Facebook), Jeff Bezos (Amazon), Sergey Brin (Google), and Travis Kalanik (Uber) have made billions.

Theirs is the kind of wealth and power that hasn’t really been seen since Victorian industrialists and US robber barons. Do they deserve it?

If there’s a story that unites success in Silicon Valley and the new abridgement that’s given us iPhones and Uber, it’s that geek innovators are rewarded. Architect the killer app and the cash will roll in. Big brains mean a big pay day. It may be a new economy, but this is a very old mistake.

The idea that those at the top of a business are the ones who should be acclaimed makes little sense to anyone who absolutely works in an alignment like Tesla. They might be the ones who make the headlines, but it’s the accustomed advisers who do the work and aftermath the value.

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